Combating the stereotype

My last post introduced the whole notion of the impact that media has on our perceptions of normality. It centred on how women, in particular, are enhanced and photoshopped to a large extent in magazines in particular. According to a 2010 study, 81% of girls would rather see real or natural photos of models in magazines. 63% of girls stated how body image displayed by the media is “unrealistic” yet, 60% say that they compare themselves to the fashion models and over half again wished that they were as skinny as the models in the photos. In short, girls see images that – despite recognizing as unrealistic, unattainable, and often not even real – they aspire to meet and then suffer when they can’t help but fail to do so (Nyc.gov, 2015).

This new post will highlight how (thankfully!) how different campaigns, organisations and certain celebrities are speaking out against such issues and are fighting to have women represented in a fair and realistic light.

The Big Apple is one of the first cities to take on and tackle such issues as a whole. Later on in the fall of 2015 it aims to target its campaign to young girls aged 7-12 years in order to help showcase the importance of individualism and normality. It aims to showcase a number of videos and images displays at bus shelters, busses themselves, park benches with the words “I am a girl, I a beautiful the way I am”. The initiative also is providing a curriculum aimed at 10 – 15 year old girls which explains positive changes in girls’ body image, body satisfaction, and body esteem. Although not implemented in all schools, it has been met with great success in after school sessions and in summer schools and the initiative aims to have the program implemented in 200 + schools by the end of the year. If you want more information be sure to click  here

A great initiative which tackles the lies offered by media. However I cannot help but be saddened by the whole initiative. It has now gotten to such a stage that young women are in need of formal education which needs to explain to them that they are fine the way they look, oh and just because you don’t look like one of the models in a magazine, well that’s okay. Oh and in fact its actually acceptable to just be yourself. Yep, to young women on today’s society, such concepts are alien when really they should be the most natural thing in the world.

Another great initiative has been offered by Dove:

This initiative was launched over 10 years ago! Dove acknowledged that women were not displayed in a realistic light and so it made to change that. Dove instead sought out real women to be advertised in their campaigns. These women were from a range of backgrounds and average sized women are being displayed in their advertisements. By doing this, Dove is challenging the stereo types associated with women and promotes a healthy body image.

Celebrities are also speaking out about photoshopping:

Recently Ashley has spoken out:

Photo of Ashley Benson with a recent post on Instagram reading: "Saw this floating around hope its not the poster. Our faces in this were from 4 years ago and we all look riduclous. Way too much photoshop, we all have flaws. No one looks like this, its not attractive
Image credit (Nyc.gov, 2015) available fromhttp://www.nyc.gov/html/girls/html/issues/issues.shtml

The intent is phenomenal. By publicly stating and publicly highlighting the fact that she is merely a representation of herself, not her true self is significant. This is sure to have an impact on the readers of such. The fact that she distinguishes herself from the image is interesting, for all too often, the reader is unaware or simply forgets the fat that the image has been photoshopped.

The point is that women should be fairly represented by the media and more than ever we are hearing a murmuring of voices speaking out, advocating for a rightful representation of women. But what about men?  more to come on that in the next post so stay tuned (always wanted to write that!)

Sources

Nyc.gov, (2015). NYC Girl’s Project – The Issues. [online] Available at: http://www.nyc.gov/html/girls/html/issues/issues.shtml [Accessed 11 Feb. 2015].

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